KRMBA News


Final chance to fight Wilderness additions and Save Trails in the Kernville Area

posted Jan 31, 2016, 10:44 AM by Kern River Mountain Bike Association

Help protect trails and land in the Kernville area!!
Today is the last day for final comments on the proposed Wilderness Additions to Sequoia and Inyo National Forests. Just take a short moment to voice your concern on the USFS comment page (scroll down) here:

https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public/CommentInput?project=3375

Congress just passed the new Wilderness designations that closed down some of the very best trails in Idaho - Dont let this happen here in California.


Below are General Comments on Wilderness and Specific Trail comments for one of the Wilderness options.

COMMENTS ON WILDERNESS  IN SEQUOIA NATIONAL FOREST



  • Please to do not designate any additional Wilderness land; the nature of the land being considered is not appropriate for Wilderness and does not meet Wilderness standards. We have had several rounds of Wilderness designations over the years, and the existing Wilderness is sufficient for the goals that it was intended to fulfill.  


  • Wilderness is an outdated solution for land management as it completely restricts the fastest growing user group on public land, mountain biking.  In a time where mountain biking is growing exponentially in the Sequoia National Forest, this makes no sense and concentrates bikers on the highest use trails and forces them into hot, dry, lower elevation climates.  New recreation and trail options are needed, not less.


  • Wilderness destroys all future options for new and properly designed trails.  “Cherry Stemming” does not work in this area; burnt forest, trees, steep terrain, flash flooding are common here, and trails often need major re-routes and improvements to be passable.  Moving Wilderness boundaries so close to existing trails shows a misunderstanding of how land and trails change, and how modern trail building has evolved. There is no flexibility for intelligent planning into the future.  


  • The Sequoia NF’s tag line is “The Land of Many Uses,” yet 41% of the Sequoia NF ALREADY is Wilderness. (322,314 acres of Wilderness in the 772,231 acre Sequoia National Forest). Only 1.4% of Sequoia NF visitors even enter Wilderness lands according to the Sequoia NVUM.   The 99% of Forest visitors would be limited to even less land and recreational opportunities.  


  • Wilderness has already destroyed too many recreational areas.  One good example is  Domelands in the Sequoia National Forest. It used to be a thriving rock climbing destination, with a very high quality climbing guide book dedicated to it.  Now, no one can access the climbing spots without a large multi-day hike. Few people climb or hike it now, and the trails are disappearing. The entire region is now relatively inaccessible.  


  • Locals use these lands extensively and depend economically on the recreation provided in multi-use land.


  • Since wilderness destroys and closes off recreational opportunity for future generations, it should actually be retracted in places where it is inappropriately designated.

Specific Trail Comments

Concerning the recommendations for the 7 potential additions to 2 existing wilderness areas in the Sequoia National Forest,:    

  • 2 potential additions to the west side of the Domeland Wilderness  

  • 1 potential addition to the north side (Fish Creek area) of the Domeland Wilderness  

  • 4 potential additions to the western and southern sides of the South Sierra Wilderness


This would result in the loss of several mountain biking opportunities.


South Sierra Wilderness Western Addition


This area has become very popular with mountain bikers from the Eastern Sierra, Big Bear, Kern River Valley and Central Valley, etc.  It provides a rare opportunity to ride mountain bikes on alpine singletrack above the heat of the summer.


This Wilderness Addition would close the recently cleared and reopened Bitter Creek Trail (34E03) to mountain bikes near the popular Kennedy Meadows area.  The changes would move the Wilderness Boundary only a very small distance up to the paved Sherman Pass Road (22S05), which seems hardly worth the hassle and expense.


Dropping 1500 ft+ from Rodeo Flat, Bitter Creek Trail is one of the only non-motorized options in the entire region, and is a very suitable and sustainable mountain bike trail.  It can be biked as an ‘out and back,’ or be ridden as a loop (or shuttled) with Sherman Pass Road.  It is also the closest legal singletrack to the Eastern Sierra in this region.  With a significant increase in the number of mountain bikers riding this trail this year, we can't lose this precious trail!


The proposed addition also moves the boundary to within 70 feet of the Jackass National Scenic Trail (35313), which leaves very little room for re-routes or improvements to this very popular motorized trail.  It also closes off the opportunity to loop this trail with the lower Hooker Meadow Trail (35E05), which would be lost with the new Wilderness addition. (A short connector would make a great loop here. Also Stewards of the Sequoia is proposing to move back the existing Wilderness boundary, to bring back the original loop).  Hooker Meadow Trail also currently makes a beautiful ‘out and back’ ride in the midst of a giant stand of Aspen trees. Mountain bikers would lose this ride.

To the north, the new Wilderness would include the non-motorized trail through Broder Meadow.  It links to the Jackass Peak Trail and Granite-Broder Trail, a popular mountain bike and moto loop.



Fish Creek Wilderness Addition


The Fish Creek Wilderness Addition does not seem to affect any trails directly, but it would extend Wilderness right up to Sherman Pass Road (22S05) across from the Bitter Creek.  This may further encourage the USFS to extend the Wilderness across Bitter Creek on the north side of Sherman Pass Road, which would result in the loss of the Bitter Creek ride.



Domelands Wilderness Addition


The area and trails affected by the Domeland Wilderness Addition are on the southern Kern Plateau, and link to the Cannell Trail IMBA Epic.  Directly ‘above’ Kernville, this area is seeing a massive increase in mountain bike use.  This land offers a rare and increasingly limited area for epic cross-country riding and bikepacking at higher elevations.  


The Domelands Wilderness Addition extends the existing Wilderness right up to the motorized Sirretta Trail (34E12). This trail is in mountainous terrain and climbs to over 9500 feet in elevation. It is the main trail section of a large alpine backcountry loop that connects to Cannell Meadow Trail.  It currently is being considered for a re-route (with sustainable grades), which would improve the mountain biking quality. However the Wilderness proposal seeks to move the boundary to within feet of this trail, which would eliminate most of the possible re-route area.  There is simply no reason to move the Wilderness boundary so close to this important trail.  


Just south near Taylor Meadow, there is another excellent area for various mountain biking options. The proposed Wilderness addition would completely eliminate the Big Meadow Trail (34E15) to mountain bikes. Currently, only a small section of the trail is in the Domeland Wilderness.  Mountain bikers have been wanting to propose a contouring re-route that would skirt the edge of the existing Wilderness and connect to the other trails in the area.  All mountain bikers would lose this amazing opportunity with the new Wilderness addition.


This same section of proposed Wilderness, also extends up to Upper Dry Lake Trail (34E17), leaving no room for re-routes or changes to the trail in the future.  This excellent trail creates an important link in several mountain bike loop options.


Another major problem with this addition is that it moves the Wilderness Boundary down the ridge on the Woodpecker Trail (34E08). Currently mountain bikers can ride up to the existing Domelands Wilderness Boundary and enjoy the views of Domelands at the base of Church Dome.  It is a unique ‘out and back’ ride that links to the other trails in the area. The new Wilderness Proposal would forever take this experience away from mountain bikers.



South Sierra Wilderness Eastern Addition


The proposed section of Wilderness near Haiwee Pass eliminates a huge section of the Southern and Eastern Sierra’s mountain bike potential. In a time when recreation is increasing, the opportunity for new trails should not be destroyed in such a huge area of higher elevation land.  Mountain bikers should not be limited to riding the desert floor in the southern Eastern Sierra.  There is excellent potential for high quality mountain bike rides in the area, and they should be proposed.



Dont lose Bike Trails in the Southern Sierras!

posted Nov 21, 2015, 6:17 PM by Kern River Mountain Bike Association

COMMENTS ON WILDERNESS  IN SEQUOIA NATIONAL FOREST


In the Sequoia National Forest, there are recommendations for 7 potential additions to 2 existing wilderness areas:    

  • 2 potential additions to the west side of the Domeland Wilderness  

  • 1 potential addition to the north side (Fish Creek area) of the Domeland Wilderness  

  • 4 potential additions to the western and southern sides of the South Sierra Wilderness


This would result in the loss of several mountain biking opportunities.


South Sierra Wilderness Western Addition


This area has become very popular with mountain bikers from the Eastern Sierra, Big Bear, Kern River Valley and Central Valley, etc.  It provides a rare opportunity to ride mountain bikes on alpine singletrack above the heat of the summer.


This Wilderness Addition would close the recently cleared and reopened Bitter Creek Trail (34E03) to mountain bikes near the popular Kennedy Meadows area.  The changes would move the Wilderness Boundary only a very small distance up to the paved Sherman Pass Road (22S05), which seems hardly worth the hassle and expense.


Dropping 1500 ft+ from Rodeo Flat, Bitter Creek Trail is one of the only non-motorized options in the entire region, and is a very suitable and sustainable mountain bike trail.  It can be biked as an ‘out and back,’ or be ridden as a loop (or shuttled) with Sherman Pass Road.  It is also the closest legal singletrack to the Eastern Sierra in this region.  With a significant increase in the number of mountain bikers riding this trail this year, we can't lose this precious trail!


The proposed addition also moves the boundary to within 70 feet of the Jackass National Scenic Trail (35313), which leaves very little room for re-routes or improvements to this very popular motorized trail.  It also closes off the opportunity to loop this trail with the lower Hooker Meadow Trail (35E05), which would be lost with the new Wilderness addition. (A short connector would make a great loop here. Also Stewards of the Sequoia is proposing to move back the existing Wilderness boundary, to bring back the original loop).  Hooker Meadow Trail also currently makes a beautiful ‘out and back’ ride in the midst of a giant stand of Aspen trees. Mountain bikers would lose this ride.

To the north, the new Wilderness would include the non-motorized trail through Broder Meadow.  It links to the Jackass Peak Trail and Granite-Broder Trail, a popular mountain bike and moto loop.



Fish Creek Wilderness Addition


The Fish Creek Wilderness Addition does not seem to affect any trails directly, but it would extend Wilderness right up to Sherman Pass Road (22S05) across from the Bitter Creek.  This may further encourage the USFS to extend the Wilderness across Bitter Creek on the north side of Sherman Pass Road, which would result in the loss of the Bitter Creek ride.



Domelands Wilderness Addition


The area and trails affected by the Domeland Wilderness Addition are on the southern Kern Plateau, and link to the Cannell Trail IMBA Epic.  Directly ‘above’ Kernville, this area is seeing a massive increase in mountain bike use.  This land offers a rare and increasingly limited area for epic cross-country riding and bikepacking at higher elevations.  


The Domelands Wilderness Addition extends the existing Wilderness right up to the motorized Sirretta Trail (34E12). This trail is in mountainous terrain and climbs to over 9500 feet in elevation. It is the main trail section of a large alpine backcountry loop that connects to Cannell Meadow Trail.  It currently is being considered for a re-route (with sustainable grades), which would improve the mountain biking quality. However the Wilderness proposal seeks to move the boundary to within feet of this trail, which would eliminate most of the possible re-route area.  There is simply no reason to move the Wilderness boundary so close to this important trail.  


Just south near Taylor Meadow, there is another excellent area for various mountain biking options. The proposed Wilderness addition would completely eliminate the Big Meadow Trail (34E15) to mountain bikes. Currently, only a small section of the trail is in the Domeland Wilderness.  Mountain bikers have been wanting to propose a contouring re-route that would skirt the edge of the existing Wilderness and connect to the other trails in the area.  All mountain bikers would lose this amazing opportunity with the new Wilderness addition.


This same section of proposed Wilderness, also extends up to Upper Dry Lake Trail (34E17), leaving no room for re-routes or changes to the trail in the future.  This excellent trail creates an important link in several mountain bike loop options.


Another major problem with this addition is that it moves the Wilderness Boundary down the ridge on the Woodpecker Trail (34E08). Currently mountain bikers can ride up to the existing Domelands Wilderness Boundary and enjoy the views of Domelands at the base of Church Dome.  It is a unique ‘out and back’ ride that links to the other trails in the area. The new Wilderness Proposal would forever take this experience away from mountain bikers.



South Sierra Wilderness Eastern Addition


The proposed section of Wilderness near Haiwee Pass eliminates a huge section of the Southern and Eastern Sierra’s mountain bike potential. In a time when recreation is increasing, the opportunity for new trails should not be destroyed in such a huge area of higher elevation land.  Mountain bikers should not be limited to riding the desert floor in the southern Eastern Sierra.  There is excellent potential for high quality mountain bike rides in the area, and they should be proposed.



Additional thoughts on Wilderness:


  • We believe that Wilderness is an outdated solution for land management as it completely restricts the fastest growing user group on public land, mountain biking.  In a time where mountain biking is growing exponentially in the Sequoia National Forest, this makes no sense and concentrates bikers on the highest use trails and forces them into hot, dry, lower elevation climates.


  • The Sequoia NF’s tag line is “The Land of Many Uses,” yet 41% of the Sequoia NF ALREADY is Wilderness. (322,314 acres of Wilderness in the 772,231 acre Sequoia National Forest). Only 1.4% of Sequoia NF visitors even enter Wilderness lands according to the Sequoia NVUM.   The 99% of Forest visitors would be limited to even less land and recreational opportunities.  (See Stewards of the Sequoia for more detail.)


  • Wilderness destroys all future options for new and properly designed trails.  “Cherry Stemming” does not work in this area; burnt forest , trees, steep terrain, flash flooding are common here, and trails often need major re-routes and improvements to be passable.  Moving Wilderness boundaries so close to existing trails shows a misunderstanding of how land and trails change, and how modern trail building has evolved.


  • Since wilderness destroys and closes off recreational opportunity for future generations, it should be retracted in places where it is inappropriately designated. (Stewards of the Sequoia is proposing 3 boundary adjustments that would restore loops.)





KRMBA Comments on Newly Proposed Wilderness to USFS (which would attempt to shut down several bike trails and future trail re-routes & options)

posted Oct 18, 2014, 5:08 PM by Kern River Mountain Bike Association


Re: Wilderness Evaluation for the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra National Forests

KRMBA opposes new Wilderness additions for several reasons:

We have had several rounds of Wilderness designations over the years, and the existing Wilderness is
excessively sufficient for the goals that it was intended to fulfill.

The nature of the land being considered is not appropriate for Wilderness and does not meet Wilderness standards.

Most importantly, Wilderness is far too restrictive for recreation and public access. It does not allow for
Mountain Biking and forces recreation into smaller and smaller areas. It is unjust that only a limited number of horsemen and hikers are allowed backcountry experiences, where mountain bikers were once able to ride.

As Mountain Biking grows, trails are being realigned,improved, and rebuilt to modern trail building
standards. With Wilderness, the options are destroyed forever. Even when bike trails are "cherry-stemmed" in Wilderness, the old unsustainable trail alignments are cemented in place forever. There is no flexibility for intelligent planning into the future.

Even as a hiker and backpacker, additional Wilderness limits access to the original and more appropriate Wilderness lands. Because it is accessible only to the most fit hikers and horsemen, it consistently destroys trails due to lack of use.

The extensive existing Wilderness has severally limited access to high altitude terrain, and the new
Wilderness additions seek to take away even more. There are very few options for mountain bikers to
escape the summer heat and recreate in the mountains.

Locals use these lands extensively and depend economically on the recreation provided in multiuse
land.

In both the Sequoia National Forest and Inyo National Forests, mountain biking is a rapidly growing sport and a very important part of the economy.  New recreation and trail options are needed, not less.

Wilderness has already destroyed too many recreational areas. One good example is Domelands in the
Sequoia National Forest. It used to be a thriving rock climbing location, with a very high quality climbing guide book dedicated to it. Now, no one can access the climbing spots without a large multi-day hike. Few people climb or hike it now, and the trails are disappearing. The entire region is now relatively inaccessible.

The lands being evaluated can be protected without the archaic and outdated Wilderness designation.
Please oppose any new Wilderness.

New Tobias-Portuguese Connector Trail Proposal & Comments on the USFS Tobias Timber Project

posted Sep 25, 2014, 7:49 PM by Kern River Mountain Bike Association   [ updated Nov 3, 2014, 1:56 PM ]

1. We agree with the decommissioning and converting of 24S83 & 24S80 into a 2wheeled
trail. This is a superb idea.

2. Will the existing singletrack trails be protected from transforming into logging roads? We are
concerned about maintaining the narrow character of the singletrack trails in the project area.

3. With the enactment of this project and new logging operations, it seems like an opportune
time to propose a new multiuse connector singletrack trail in the affected area. There is a need
for a trail to link Portuguese Pass with Frog Meadow & Tobias Trail. Mountain bikers have been
riding the Portuguese Pass Trail (31E59) from Greenhorn Summit to the recently cleared Tobias
Trail (32e34) This is already one of the best mountain bike rides in the southern sierras, and has
the potential to be a worldclass mountain bike trail with continuous singletrack. 

A historical trail (with old tree blazes) continues north from Portuguese Pass and eventually merges with Road 23S18 near the road 24S50. This could become an officially designated route. A new trail could then cross road 24S50 and contour along the east side of Tobias Peak to meet with the upper Tobias Trail. See included map.

Most importantly, this trail would reinstate the original linked trail network of the Greenhorns;
which was largely converted to logging roads in the past. Along with the Portuguese and Tobias
trails, it would provide a connection to the Pup Meadow Trail (31E53), Deer Creek (31E56), Lion
Ridge (31E52), and create almost continuous singletrack from Alta Sierra to Johnsondale and
California Hot Springs for hikers and mountain bikers.



It would also create an obvious loop for motorcycle riders connecting Portuguese (31E59), upper
Tobias (32e34), 24S83, and Bull Run Basin (32E39) Trails.

If approved, this trail connector could be built to sustainable IMBA (International Mountain Bike
Association) standards by experienced volunteers.

Please consider creating these incredible recreational opportunities!

 SEE ATTACHED MAP

KRMBA Comments on New Keyesville South Trails

posted Sep 25, 2014, 7:44 PM by Kern River Mountain Bike Association   [ updated Sep 25, 2014, 7:44 PM ]

NEW NON-MOTORIZED SINGLETRACK TRAIL NETWORK:
Keyesville has so much potential for an excellent trail network. 
The east side of Pearl Harbor Dr contains some of the best land for scenic non-motorized recreation.  It could have a high-quality stacked loop trail network that weaves and contours the mountains above the river................................The trails could also link to the Keyesville Classic Trail for larger mountain bike loop options.

There should also be a non-motorized singletrack trail connecting the Slippery Rock parking area with the primary staging area.  It could contour around the hills will river views.  This will greatly increase the quality of experience for human-powered recreation participants who want to avoid roads and vehicles.

There is an enormous amount of support for new trails in Keyesville from the mountain bike community across California.  Any new trails should be built to IMBA (International Mountain Bike Association) standards with contouring low angle pitches, frequent grade reversals, and minimal maintenance needs.  Local volunteers from KRMBA (Kern River Mountain Bike Association) and trained IMBA members would help construct any approved trails.

Updated 2014 Comments on BLM, Keyesville, & New Keyesville Classic Trail & Downhill Only Trail

posted Sep 25, 2014, 7:42 PM by Kern River Mountain Bike Association   [ updated Sep 25, 2014, 7:42 PM ]

Keyesville Classic Trail

1. Officially designate the newest sections of Keyesville Classic Trail and unify the return trail of the Keyesville Classic singletrack, by creating a contouring connector through the older Pearl Harbor Memorial area.

This would allow a continuous singletrack route from Kern Canyon Trail, and allow mountain bikers to avoid Pearl Harbor Drive. The support for this trail from other mountain biking groups throughout Southern California is huge. KRMBA, CORBA, and SSFTA have all offered to help with design, construction, and maintenance associated with this singletrack. Attached is a general route suggestion. 
Inline image 2
2. Keeping the singletrack character of the trails should be an important goal. Narrow singletrack trails are the highest priority for mountain bikers. Proper signage and barricades, such as boulders, could help keep ATV’s and 4-wheelers off of 2-wheeled singletrack trails. A continuous return trail with few intersections (if any), as described above, should help this issue as well.   This would create a primary and high-quality biking loop in Keyesvillle.

One-Way Non-Motorized Downhill and/or Flow Mountain Bike Trail in Keyesville

The BLM in other areas of the western states have enacted very successful plans that include both multi-use trails and user-specific purpose-built trails, such as one-way mountain bike trails. One excellent example that we would want to emulate are the changes made on BLM land at Hartman Rocks in Gunnison, Colorado, which includes several multi-use and purpose-built trails that have replaced the ‘free-for-all’ OHV use. Now users of all types are able to use the land in a sustainable conflict-free manner.  

We propose a one-way downhill trail in Keyesville, similar in character to trails in Hartman Rocks BLM Recreation Area and new BLM trails in Croy Canyon near Ketchum, Idaho.

The trail should be designed as a sustainable and "purpose-built" trail for intermediate through expert mountain bike riders. It should incorporate the natural terrain features for both “flow” and technical skills. A one-way trail makes it safer and a mountain bike-only designation would enhance the user experience with mountain bike specific trail features. 

This trail would most likely be the most popular trail in Keyesville and could be used as an alternative Keyesville Classic Downhill Course and part of the Enduro/Super D Race Course. (Enduro is an endurance downhill race, which has become one of the most popular races in biking).

Attached below is an image of a possible trail area in two sections. The lower section of the proposed trail follows existing trails and avoids the motorized dirt roads. The top section of the proposed trail starts one ridge over from Tombstone Ridge and is entirely off of private property.

If approved, this trail could be entirely built and maintained by volunteers. A purpose-built bike-only trail in Keyesville would be met with incredible enthusiasm from the mountain bike community across Southern California and would provide a highly desired type of recreational opportunity that has been lacking in the area.


Protect the multi-use trails between Keyesville and Hwy 155

Several of the trails that connect Dutch Flat and BLM Land  to the Just Outstanding Trail on USFS land, are highly utilized by mountain bikers.  Many bikers (and motorcyclists) ride from the popular trail to Wagy Ridge Trail which leads to BLM Land and out to Sawmill Road via 2 different trails. From Sawmill Road, bikers take the connecting singletrack trails to climb up to the Borderline singletrack (many bikers call this Wall Street) to access Dutch Flat Trail/Snake Pit Trail.  This has become a very popular route (an Epic Ride!) for local and visiting mountain bikers.  We hope the BLM keeps all of these trails open and available for mountain bike and motorcycle use.

Inline image 3

Thanks to you and the BLM for involving the public and for your consideration of our ideas!

2011 KRMBA New BLM / Keyesville Trail Proposal with Maps

posted Sep 25, 2014, 7:37 PM by Kern River Mountain Bike Association   [ updated Sep 25, 2014, 7:45 PM ]

Comments on the

Bakersfield BLM Resource Management Plan

by the Kern River Mountain Bike Association


Kern River Mountain Bike Association (KRMBA)  is a bike club in the process of becoming a non profit 501c3 association. KRMBA represents the mountain biking interests of the Kern River Valley and Southern Sierra.

December 8, 2011

Bakersfield RMP
Bureau of Land Management
3801 Pegasus Drive, Bakersfield, CA 93308


Dear BLM Planning Team,

On behalf of Kern River Mountain Bike Association (KRMBA), representing the interests of mountain bikers in the Kern River Valley, we would like to submit comments on the Bakersfield BLM Draft RMP 2011.

While KRMBA enjoys, supports, and maintains many multi-use trails,  one goal of KRMBA is to encourage “human powered” non-motorized recreation as well.   This enhances user experience and allows for more sustainable trail use.   The BLM in other areas of the western states have enacted very successful plans that include both multi-use trails and user-specific purpose-built trails, such as one-way mountain bike trails.  One excellent example that we would want to emulate are the changes made on BLM land at Hartman Rocks in Gunnison, Colorado, which includes several multi-use and purpose-built trails that have replaced the ‘free-for-all’ OHV use.   Now users of all types are able to use the land in a sustainable conflict-free manner.  

KRMBA has comments on 5 trails, as described below.    If needed, I have GPX and KML files of all trails discussed below.

We hope that you will consider our comments.
.......................................................................................


Keyesville Classic Trail

1.  Officially designate the newest sections of Keyesville Classic Trail.  The 2011 Keyesville Classic Mountain Bike Race included 2 new return-route sections to avoid riding on Pearl Harbor Drive.  These trails, which followed a contouring cow trail and an old flume trail, have become excellent high quality additions to the trail.  These trails  alone were a highlight of the cross country race, and mountain bikers continue to ride them as part of the return loop of the Keyesville Classic.

2.  Unify the return trail of the Keyesville Classic singletrack, by creating a connector through the older Pearl Harbor Memorial area. This would allow a continuous singletrack route from Kern Canyon Trail, and allow mountain bikers to avoid Pearl Harbor Drive. The support for this trail from other mountain biking groups throughout Southern California is huge.   KRMBA, CORBA, and SSFTA have all offered to help with design, construction,  and maintenance associated with this singletrack.

3.  Keeping the singletrack character of the trails should be an important goal.  Narrow singletrack trails are the highest priority for mountain bikers.  Proper signage and barricades, such as boulders, could help keep ATV’s and 4-wheelers off of 2-wheeled singletrack trails.  A continuous return trail with few intersections, as described above, should help this issue as well.

Below is a Google Earth image of the existing and proposed Keyesville Classic return trail.




One-Way Non-Motorized Downhill Mountain Bike Trail in Keyesville

We propose a one-way downhill trail in Keyesville, similar in character to trails in Hartman Rocks BLM Recreation Area and new BLM trails in Croy Canyon near Ketchum, Idaho.

The trail should be designed as a sustainable and "purpose-built" trail for intermediate through expert mountain bike riders.  It should incorporate the natural terrain features for both “flow” and technical skills.  A one-way trail makes it safer and a mountain bike only designation would enhance the user experience with mountain bike specific trail features.  

This trail could be used as an alternative Keyesville Classic Downhill Course and part of the Super D Race Course. (Super D is an endurance downhill race, which has become one of the most popular races in biking).

Below is an image of the general proposed route in two sections.   The lower section of the proposed trail entirely follows existing cow and avoids the motorized dirt roads.  The top section of the proposed trail starts one ridge over from Tombstone Ridge and is entirely off of private property.


If approved, this trail could be entirely built and maintained by volunteers.  A purpose-built bike-only trail in Keyesville would be met with incredible enthusiasm from the mountain bike community across Southern California and would provide a highly desired type of recreational opportunity that has been lacking in the area.


Cyrus Canyon Trail

For many years, there has been an access trail ascending Cyrus Canyon, which has seen hiker and mountain biker use.   Since the land is now under BLM management, we propose that this trail be included in the Resource Management Plan as a non-motorized multi-use trail.   

The terrain and slope are excellent for mountain biking, and it has the potential to be one of the best winter rides in the region.  The BLM controls the only access into this beautiful area.  Local mountain bikers are eager to help with any trail maintenance or re-routes if the trail is approved by the BLM.  The trail has been blocked off by a fence at the dirt road.  We ask that an access through this fence is provided for non-motorized users.

Below is an image of the trail in 2 parts.  The lower Western section is a trail that follows an old road, while the upper section is a narrower use-trail that contours above the drainage.


Please consider adding this trail to the Resource Management Plan.  KRMBA would be willing to formally adopt the trail, and do anything necessary to allow mountain bike and hiking access.


Badrock Ridge Trail

Another trail of importance to mountain bikers is Badrock Ridge Trail, which descends from USFS land to Erskine Creek Road in Lake Isabella.  We strongly urge the BLM to keep this trail open and to include in it as a multi-use trail in the Resource Management Plan.  With its unsurpassed views and variety of terrain, It has the potential to be the most popular shuttled bike rides in the state of California.

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